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Habits

Addicted to Crap

Discarded McDonalds packaging
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The picture: the honey-coloured bun, the juicy beef and that weird-but-delicious golden cheese melting all over it, and sitting right next to it is the box of cracking-hot, fresh out of the pan and lightly salted fries. De-lic-ious!

I hate junk food. No, seriously, I do. I’ve never liked fried food, not ever. It usually makes me feel a bit sick afterwards, and now, in my … well, we’ll say adult years, I find I can suffer occasional bouts of indigestion after a particularly fatty meal. And I also notice that I end up feeling a bit down after I’ve eaten a pile of greasy mess, like when a favourite TV show has just been cancelled.  (more…)

The Great Taste Sensation

Studies show that broccoli may help in the pre...

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I’ve always loved my vegies. I know, weird, huh? I was lucky to grow up with a mother who didn’t boil the crap out of them before forcing us to consume half-cold, grey tasteless mashy stuff on a daily basis. Instead, she cooked us honey carrots, zucchini with garlic and butter, cauliflower cheese, broccoli and green beans in white wine and garlic. The list goes on. The point is, the vegies tasted fantastic, so we ate them up. But I’ve recently discovered something unexpected while making meals on my diet and it’s changed my eating habits forever. (more…)

The Need for Food

Full course dinner

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One of the complaints I hear most from people who carry extra weight but who struggle to lose it is, “But I hardly eat anything. How come I never lose any weight?”.

These people skip breakfast – or just have coffee, will have a sandwich for lunch and steamed vegetables for dinner, or a bowl of breakfast cereal instead. They consume a tiny number of calories and yet still, no matter what they do, their bodies will shed no fat.

The answer is in the question. It’s also in our genes and there is nothing we can do to change it, because the cause is something that actually helps us to survive. (more…)

Surprised

Chicken Makhani, murgh makhani, or "Butte...

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I did an unbelievable thing last night. Something I’m quite sure I’ve never done before. Even now, hours later, I’m still surprised by it.

I went to dinner at the home of some friends. I’d not said anything to them about being on any kind of diet. That was quite deliberate, because I don’t necessarily want people going out of their way to feed me food they think will be okay, and then having them stress that I can’t eat whatever it is they’ve been generous enough to serve me. Besides, I know these people are pretty conscious about eating healthy food, and they grow almost all their own vegetables, so I knew that even if the meal was outside my prescribed diet, it would be good for me and it would taste great. Seriously, that’s all anybody should hope for in a free meal, right? (more…)

Resisting Resistance

Quarter Pounder with Cheese Box (marketed in E...

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On Tuesday night I found myself sitting on the couch, eating MacDonalds for dinner, for the second night in a row. This was, I should point out, a strange and unwelcome experience for me. (more…)

Being Precious

food sources of magnesium: bran muffins, pumpk...

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There is nothing in this world so easy as failing a diet. It takes no effort at all. Sometimes, no more than a thought will push you over to the Dark Side, and calories are instantly converted to pounds of unwilling, globulous fat. (more…)

Hardly a Diet

The original graph of body size versus metabol...

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When we think about a diet these days, we all have the same image of celery sticks, dry biscuits and lettuce leaves: tasteless food and an endless feeling of hunger. A constant feeling of being dissatisfied and wanting more. And the unending desperation to eat something solid and substantial. I’d like to say that these kinds of diets are well out of fashion but alas, there are some out there that still treat the body this badly.

The studies done into ‘deprivation dieting’ (which is what the above description… er, describes) have proven one fact above all else – when you deprive your body in such a way, you both decrease your metabolic rate (because your body thinks starvation time has come around again) and increase your subconscious need to binge eat. These are both unconscious, physiological body responses to a sudden and sustained lack of food. These responses are genetically built into us and were what helped our ancient ancestors to survive fammine. What they are not, is any help to losing weight. (more…)

Sweet Dreams: How Sleep Deprivation Makes You Fat & Depressed – Part 5

This is a graphic which shows the average hour...

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Most people believe that they can skip an hour’s sleep and not be affected. This is not true, unfortunately. Just an hour less sleep at night will affect your moods and your responses throughout the following day. It’s also a common belief that if you miss sleep during the week, that having a good sleep in on Sunday morning will catch you up. While an extra injection of sleep will definitely help, it won’t actually undo all the damage missing sleep in the first place will cause. The only way to ensure you don’t suffer with sleep deprivation is to make sure you get the right amount of hours every night. Yeah, sounds easy, doesn’t it. Don’t you just hate it when people do that? (more…)

Causes of Obesity Part 5 – 7 Bad Habits for Weight Gain

Recreated :File:Neuron-no labels2.png in Inksc...
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Let me ask you a question: When did you last do something for the very first time, or did a familiar thing in a different way?

We humans, apart from being way too complicated for our own good, are creatures of habit. Believe it or not, that doesn’t mean we’re lazy or unadventurous. That just happens to be how our brains work best. Whenever we perform an action (or think a particular thought) pathways are laid out in our brains specific to that action. If we do that same action again, another pathway is laid down in the same place. The more times we do the action, the bigger that pathway gets until it becomes established in our brains as our preferred way of performing that action.

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